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Meet the Nominees

June Q2 2024 Nominees

Haus of Codec

EIN: 87-1199109

WEBSITE: hausofcodec.org

SOCIAL: instagram.com/hausofcodec

facebook.com/hausofcodec/

Mission Statement

Building community through the arts and Educational Empowerment. Based in the Creative Capital, Haus of Codec is committed to ensuring an end to transition-aged youth homelessness in Providence through the arts and workforce development. Established in 2021.

 

Who They Serve

Transition aged LGBTQIA+ youth in Rhode Island aged 16-24.

 

 

How Would Funds Be Used 

The donations will impact about 27 clients throughout 3 different housing projects, all of our clients are somewhere in the LGBTQ+ spectrum. It costs about $3,000 per client/per month to provide food our food pantry, provide access to public transportation, 1 hot meal a day, internet, and more.

Annual Budget

Annual Operating Budget: $300,000 

Annual Operating Costs: $475,000

 

Sources of Funding

Annual drives, fundraisers, federal funding, individual donations

From the Nominating Member, Brittanny Taylor
"I am Vice President of Haus of Codec, Rhode Island's first transitional housing for LGBTQIA+ youth. I am nominating this organization for our commitment to supporting Rhode Island's committed to ensuring an end to transition-aged youth homelessness in Providence through the arts and workforce development. It is incredible to watch the amount of growth this organization has gone through since it's foundation in 2021. We went from one shelter with six beds to three shelters and more opening in 2024."

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Pawtucket Backpackers

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EIN: 47-5657985

Website: N/A

Additional information can be found at the United Way site here

or Rhode Island monthly article (2013)

Social: https://www.facebook.com/pawtucket.backpackers

Mission Statement

To provide supplemental food for Pawtucket students facing food insecurity on weekends 

 

Who They Serve

Pawtucket students and their families, as well as six school-based food pantries

 

How Would Funds Be Used 

Food has been provided for 36 weeks during this school year. PB provided 16,166 bags of food for students equaling more than 100,000 pounds of food during the first 31 weeks (the school year is not yet finished). With this donation, we would be able to shop for more nutritious food, fruit cups, applesauce, oatmeal, and granola bars, etc., supplementing what we receive from the Food Bank and outreach programs. These items total about $600 each week for 500 students. 

As school comes to an end, talks are in the works with 3 -4 schools (Agnes Little, Fallon Elementary, Jenks Middle School and Slater Middle School) to implement programs in late July, providing food at least once this summer to give families that little extra needed to help make ends meet.

 

Annual Budget 

Annual Operating Costs: 2023: Receipts show $13, 838.95, disbursements $11, 659.57

This organization is 100% volunteer. In 2023 $615 was spent purchasing totes and delivery bags

 

Sources of Funding 

Grants from RI Food Bank, RI House of Representatives, Temple BethEl, Nathanael Greene Elementary PTA, Burger King, Quota Club, Stop & Shop Growin’ 4 Good, and individuals through Facebook (network for good) and Paypal

Additional Information

Pawtucket Backpackers is housed at Blackstone Academy Charter School who has graciously donated storage space and storage racks to stock with overflow, as well as an area for preparing bags each week at no cost. THe Backapckers are a dedicated group of 8 core volunteers, with occasional groups from Collette Travel, AAA, RI Housing, Boystown, Neighborhood Health, Hasbro, the City of Pawtucket, the United Way, and Coastal One; the community police department helps to deliver bags to schools.

 

From the Nominating Member, Marti Schwartz
"Pawtucket Backpackers were mentioned in a Providence Journal volunteer column and I visited them as volunteers were packing bags to be dispersed. I was impressed by the highly organized procedure as well as the dedication of those who saw a need and were determined to fill it."

Urban Perinatal Education Center

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EIN: 86-2397226

Website: http://urbanperinatal.org

Social: instagram.com/urbanperinatalri

facebook.com/urbanperinatalri/

Mission Statement

UPEC's mission is to substantially improve perinatal health outcomes among the Black and BIPOC community. On a national level, Rhode Island included, there is a Black Maternal Health crisis with an 84% preventable maternal mortality and morbidity data range. UPEC is seeking to promote community based service through education, counseling and services. UPEC is grounded in addressing perinatal disparities in communities of color through through three lenses: culturally congruent care, equity in care, and building a workforce for change. Classes are offered in nutrition, childbirth ed., mental health support, post partum and lactation ed./support. UPEC operates a Donor Milk Depot and Dispensary, and a Certified Perinatal Doula referral service. They are initiating an Easy Access Clinic on site for wellness visits to support and empower Black and BIPOC families in their own healthcare. Founded 2021 by Quatia Osorio.

Who They Serve

Pregnant Black and Black Indigenous People of Color (BIPOC) and their families

How Would Funds Be Used 

Grant funds would be used to expand their Childbirth Education classes and to sponsor 150 nursing mothers to receive in home Lactation training and lactation kits - pumps etc.

 

Annual Budget 

Annual operating budget: $120,000 

Annual operating costs: $140,000

Sources of Funding 

Corporate, foundation and individual donors

From the Nominating Member, Denise Cornwall:

"I was inspired to nominate UPEC because of their outstanding work in improving maternal and newborn outcomes in the Black and BIPOC communites in RI. This includes pre-natal education and care, post natal lactation support, and midwife/doula training programs."

 

From their Application

Founder Quatia Osario is a wife and mother of 5, farmer, Certified Doula and now student-in-training midwife. She was one of a small group of RI women who successfully wrote and lobbied for legislation to require insurance companies to cover Certified Perinatal Doulas for low income families. She is a visionary who is passionate about improving health outcomes for the Black and BIPOC communities.

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